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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)
. we have the latest lessons in science and history from the gop. stay with us. >> we all like pbs. i mean, i have grand kids, they love big bird and burt ander ni and so forth, but we borrow money effectively from china to make sure our kids don't have to watch advertising on pbs. my view is it makes sense to stop borrowing many and let our kids get used to corn flakes. >> sesame street was brought today by the letter "g" for grouch. the capital one cash rewards card gives you a 50% annual bonus. and everyone likes 50% more [ russian accent ] rubles. eh, eheh, eh, eh. [ brooklyn accent ] 50% more simoleons. [ western accent ] 50% more sawbucks. ♪ [ maine accent ] 50% more clams. it's a lobster, either way. [ male announcer ] the capital one cash rewards card. with a 50% annual cash bonus, it's the card for people who like more cash. [ italian accent ] 50% more dough! what's in your wallet? a body at rest tends to stay at rest... while a body in motion tends to stay in motion. staying active can actually ease arthritis symptoms. but if you have arthritis, staying active can be diffi
think he did it here. let's watch. >> it's not rocket science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations that he has for himself. but, look, i think part of that was because, as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney. we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan which is his tax cut. i don't have a tax cut that's $4.8 trillion or $5 trillion. i'm not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a medicare voucher plan. i love teachers, i think we need more of them. i mean, look, don't believe me, speaker gingrich was pretty eloquent in running during the primaries in saying, look, mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> well, one thing i have been saying about the campaign is the president needs surrogates out there, he needs confederates, people out there. i love charleston. a lot of people -- rather charlotte because in charlotte you heard an entire political party speaking led by people like deval patrick, the governor of massachusetts, after you saw mr. mayor. i think it sounds be
. bush administration. he's now a professor of political science and public policy at duke university. we thank you both for being with us. peter feaver, to you first. we heard governor romney today criticize the president broadly for not rejecting strongly enough america's influence in the world. yet when it came to specifics, we didn't hear many details. so let me just ask you about a couple of different places in the world. what about when it comes to iran. what exactly governor romney be doing differently right now? >> well, this is the criticism that the obama campaign has leveled at the romney campaign for not being detailed and specific enough. when it comes to iran, the president hasn't laid out a red line that he said clearly he would enforce. when asked to be precise about what it means for iran not to possess a nuclear weapon, the articulation of the red line, he's been vague and says he doesn't want to parse it further. i think there's a certain element of ambiguity about where you would draw the line precisely so as to avoid being trapped by it. but the other point to make is
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
will take a close look here at edwards life sciences. this is a company that deals a lot with your heart. heart valve therapy, critical care, cardiac surgery, they are cutting their sales outlook for the third quarter. a couple reasons why they are doing this. take a look at the two-day chart. down nearly 20% today. that is a huge move for a company that has had a nice run for the year 2012. they are blaming europe. also, the expected growth here in the u.s. was not what they anticipated. lori: thank you. move over baggage fees, long lines and delays. talking on your cell phone at 10,000 feet. what do you think? next season take a look at some of today's winners and losers. green mountain coffee. up almost 2% on the day. we will be right back. ♪ 0t[h7 [ male announcer ] what if you had thermal night-vision goggles, like in a special opsission? you'd spot movement, gather intelligence with minimal coateral damage. but rather than neutralizing enemies in their sleep, you'd be targeti stocks to trade. well, that's what trade architect's heat maps do. they make you a trading assassin. tra
of marine science released a report tuesday saying a number of reeves has gone from 100 to 47 since 1985. experts blame the rapid increase in crown of thornz star fish which eat the coral. they found that ocean warming is a major cause of coral bleaching and prevents the coral from recovering from cyclone damage and they worry that it could halve againy the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe if we can take action, the crown of thorn star fish, it may leave the reef in a position that can better withstand the climactic impact. >> the great barrier reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia and is a world heritage site. >>> a gallery of japanese art has opened at an art museum in melbourne, australia. a ceremony was held on tuesday for the opening of the paulen gander gallery of japanese art named after gandel who donated her collection of japanese art. they performed a japanese ritual to celebrate the opening and the exhibits include a buddhist statue from the 8th to 12th century and a hanging scroll by an 18th century artist. it has
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
of marine science says the number of reefs has dropped from 100 to 47. since 1985. the scientists identified two main causes of coral decline. the crown of thorn star fish is growing rapidly in number. the fish feed on the coral. and ocean warming is bleaching the coral. the scientists say this prevents the reef from recovering after cyclone damage. they worn coral cover could halve again by the end of the next decade if current trends continue. >> we believe that if we can take action on one of the things we can directly control, the crown of thorn starfish, it may leave the reef in a position where it can better withstand some of these climatic impacts. >> the reef extends more than 2,000 kilometers off the coast of northeastern australia. >>> officials and locals in india pulled together to pull one endangered species from the mud. they spent ten hours digging an indian rhinoceros from a swamp in the northeastern state. about 2,300 rhinos live in the national park, two-thirds of the world's population of the endangered animal. one of the rhinos strayed from the park after it was hit by fl
the bet of the science research we can get on the space station. you have to bring in many cases samples, biological and pharmaceutical and material science experiments, they have to return samples to earth. >>trace: it will dock with the international space station on wednesday, stay there for three weeks and it before splashing de pacific ocean. >>shepard: there have been glitches? >>trace: the rocket which carries the capsule into space, it lost an engine on ascent and they had to rely on the other eight engines to get in orbit. nasa is very precise and will certainly want a full account from spacex about what happened. that could delay their next launch which is scheduled for january. spacex says the rockets are designed to be able to lose an engine and keep going. also, glitches happen. >> we will continue to always improve. we will learn from our flights and continue to improve the vehicle. given that we are looking toward flying crew on the vehicles, we want to make sure we address any and all items that we find and learn about it so we can make it more reliable. >>trace: spacex a
science to believe that the president was disappointed in the expectations he has for himself. but look, i think part of that was because as i said earlier, we met a new mitt romney, we met a mitt romney that wanted to walk away from the central theory of his economic plan, which was his tax cut. i don't have a tax plan that is 4.8 trillion, i am not going to cut taxes on the rich. i don't have a voucher plan, i love teachers, i think we need more of them. don't believe me, speaker gingrich was eloquent in the primaries, saying that mitt romney will say absolutely anything to get elected. >> the president had 90 minutes, now, if he had done his homework and prepared, if he had actually studied romney, why didn't he say it? virtually every analyst has said, and even your deputy campaign manager has said the charges -- was made wrong. forgetting that for a second, the job of the president is supposed to be able to be competent and to stand up for what he believes in and articulate what is wrong. mitt romney walked over him. >> and alex, you mentioned the president is air born to the golden s
it in the last few days. the conventional wisdom among the political science crowd is you don't have much variance between where the national horse race stands and where the race stands in the battleground states. if it moves nationally, it moves the same direction in the swing states. we see in this race closer polls nationally where obama will only be ahead by two points or whatever it is, and then you look at ohio and virginia and you see four or five, six, seven point margins. is there any imbalance between the two, and do you have any explanation for it? >> we don't have very many state polls back yet. the initial wave of state polls showed romney doing pretty well in the battleground states. in the rasmussen polls over the last two days, obama is doing better. that's consistent with the trend i talked about earlier. the question is whether obama gets an outsized bounce in states like ohio, nevada and iowa where he was doing better than nationally. if you look at all of the national polls conducted since the first debate, what you see is about a three point gain for romney. if that h
with the right skills here at home. nevada, i wanted, recruit thousands of new math and science teachers, improve early education, create 2 million more slots in community colleges so that workers can get trained for the new jobs out there now. help us work with colleges and universities to keep tuition down. that is a goal we can meet together. you cannot choose that future for america -- can choose that future for america, but what we need to do? >> vote. >> i have already worked with republicans and democrats to cut spending by $1 trillion. i'm willing to do a little bit more. i want to reform our tax code so that idea is simple and fair. but i also want to ask the wealthiest households in america to pay slightly higher taxes. that is the same rate we had when bill clinton was president and we created 23 million new jobs, the biggest surplus in history, and a whole lot of millionaires to boot. [applause] so that is my plan. in fairness, my opponent has got a plan, too. there's only one problem. some of you heard bill clinton say that there is no or arithmetic in it. [laughter] they think that
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lists. i programs and services for autism speaks, the world's leading autism science and advocacy organization. thank you so much for joining us inside "the war room." >> thank you for having me. >> jennifer: i'm so pleased you are here to provide a human perspective on what these kids might mean. why before we get to that is why is this wave of autism happening? >> fortunately, we don't know. the increase in autism over the last 20 years is tenfold and 50% of it can be explained through better diagnosis, and awareness, but the other 50% we don't really know what is behind that increase. >> jennifer: well obviously there is a huge concern on the part of would be parents and existing parents about how a child ends up being autistic. i want to play a public service announcement. let's watch that. >> i have autism. >> i have autism. >> i have autism. >> and i want you to see me as an individual. >> and not a label. >> i want autism to be an avoidable topic for our lawmakers running for office this fall. >> jennifer: so what has been the response? >> we are really t
on politics. >>science and republicans do not mix. >>now it's your turn at the only online forum with a direct line to eliot spitzer. >>join the debate now. 1cccm01724
-2010 he served as chairman of the house committee on science and technology. he is working with the brookings institution to improve public sector leadership as part of the new initiative on improving leadership and management. bill kristol is the editor of "the weekly standard" which he founded in 1995. prior to that, he led the publican -- republican feature. he also has served as foreign policy adviser to senator john mccain. all of you see him regularly on fox news sunday and the fox news channel. i met him in 1981 when he was a very young assistant professor at the university of pennsylvania. the question that i would like to pose for each of you, and i will start with governor what does this through feel about the leadership styles of mitt romney and president obama? >> probably not much. >> ok, will this panel is over. [laughter] >> you could extrapolate a few things from president obama's first term that may be instructive. he is not the manager. he does out of a history of managing things. you bring in a lot of good, well trained people and give them tasks and try
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
by thirty years of science. try centrum® silver. visit centrum-dot-com for your three dollar coupon. yeah, i might have ears like a rabbit... but i want to eat meat! [ male announcer ] iams knows dogs love meat. ...but most dry foods add plant protein, like gluten iams never adds gluten. iams adds 50% more animal protein, [ dog 2 ] look at me! i'm a lean, mean flying machine [ dog 1 ] i am too! woo hoo! [ male announcer ] iams. with 50% more animal protein. [ dog 2 ] i'm an iams dog for life. not a rabbit. woof! [ dog 2 ] i'm an iams dog for life. stop by walmart this saturday. wireless. take a one-minute demo of our new lg optimus zip. for every demo we'll donate one dollar to make-a-wish. up to one million dollars. visit one-minute-one-million-dot-com to find a participating walmart near you. they're whole grain good... and yummy good. real fruit pieces. 12 grams of whole grains and a creamy yogurt flavored coating. quaker yogurt granola bars. treat yourself good. when the doctor told me that i could smoke for the first week... i'm like...yeah, ok... little did i know that one week later i
'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ç it's just common sense. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier highways. on once empty fields. everyday you see all the ways all of us at us bank are helping grow our economy. lending more so companies and communities can expand, grow stronger and get back to work. everyday you see all of us serving you, around the country, around the corner. us bank. connell: what are you looking at? dagen: don't look at me. connell: what a start. hey everybody. quarter past the hour. time to go to nicole for stock us now as we do every 15 minutes. did you hear american express is teaming up with wal-mart? nicole: i heard a little something about that connell. let's check it out. let's see how the stocks are faring rite now. -- right now. you can see how they are doing on a day where the dow has been to the down side. this is new news for wal-mart. they are launching the blue bird. it is basi
there in the future. science, technology, and space offering technology to everybody, all the you -- all of the young ones coming up. ronald reagan is clearly the strongest leader of the free world. i will be honest with you. it is a joy to serve with a president who does not apologize for the united states of america. mr. mondale on the other hand has one idea. go out and tax the american people. he wants to wipe out the one protection that those of the lowest end of the economic scale have protecting them against being rammed into higher and higher tax brackets. we owe our country too much to go back to that kind of an approach. i would like to say something to the young people. i know what it is to have a dream and to have a job and to work hard to really participate and to the american dream. some of your finishing high school and college, some of your starting off in the workplace. we want america oppose the greatest grift -- america's greatest griffeift. it is absolutely essential that we guarantee the young people that the they will not know the agony of war. gift, opportunity and peace. we mu
good. >> "argo" science fantasy adventure. it's a turnaround. >> do we get the option? >> are you worried about the ayatollah? try the wga. >> when you have more than a hundred million people saying it's the best movie they've seen in years, you start thinking maybe it's going to be director. >> who's your director? >> can you teach someone to be a director? >> it's great movie to watch with an audience. the reactions that you get, the communal feelings, it's just terrific. >> i haven't felt this proud or excited since "good hunting." when i made "good hunting," i had no idea what i was talking about. >> all-star cast. look at that. >> it's going to come out this weekend. i look forward to seeing that. it's nice to see the passion, you know, when somebody's involved that deeply, directing in it and acting in it. >> he's invested. >> he's very invested. >> it's a long way since "armageddon." do you remember that? >> oh, yeah. >> all right. that's the news for this half hour. remember to follow us on facebook at wwnfans.com. >> because we don't want to miss a thing, channeling "arma
they need, they resort to things like self medicating. the science has proven, research has proven this is a fact. our all of these or substance abuse, depression, those are the most common diagnoses in ptsd. what we're faced with is an archaic military justice system that has not adapted, even though their own their own military law reviews show ptsd and substance abuse-related misconduct are close the related, that there is a nexus that one comes from the other. what we are addressing -- we're not asking the military to not have people held accountable for misconduct. if you need to punish someone because they illegally or in violation of regulation of used the illegal substances, go ahead and punish them within the system, but that does not mean you up to go to the extent of imposing administrative sanctions that have an impact on the rest of their life such as taking away all their benefits and then putting a person without a safety net out into the community where they then become a problem in my community. and all they do is end of draining the resources of my community. and
that the president's agenda of investment in education, more math and science teachers, help for manufacturing in the u.s., reducing oil dependency and balance much trade deficit. melissa: all you've done is talking points. you haven't answer ad single question. we're out of time. could you anticipates one of the questions. >> melissa, here is the facts. the facts are, more people are going back to work. the unemployment rate is 7.8%. this is looking very much like 1984 and ronald reagan. unemployment down, people back to work. melissa: thanks for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> my pleasure. melissa: so there is big divide in the jobs data today, as we're discussing household survey shows total employment surged 873,000, but payroll says only 114,000 people went back to work. even jack welch said it, hard to reconcile these numbers. he tweeted, unbelievable jobs numbers. these chicago guys will do anything. can't debate so they change the numbers. that is harsh criticism. here with me is economist peter morici. which also have gary burtless, senior fellow? [no audio. what do yo
. this is all based on the norwegian university science and technology new study. you know those norwegians are very tidy. they don't want to pollute the environment. but they say global warming, potential of electric vehicle production is twice that of conventional vehicles is basically twice as bad is what they're trying to say. and number one, they say that in studies in the past they didn't consider the impact of charging the battery. that the generating of the electricity to charge the battery if it comes from a coal plant, comes from a nuclear plant, you're kind of defeating the purpose of having a cleaner vehicle because you used this other dirty way to make the electricity. what do you say? >> well, that would be true if the majority of our electricity was still coming from coal but we've had some radical changes in the electric generation sector in the united states over the last couple of years. driven primarily by steadily declining natural gas prices. as a result, for the first time in american history, we are generating more of our electricity today from natural gas than from c
of jealousy. >> he's advancing science and he'll do a great job. >> reporter: and that's key here. the records mean a lot. but what this team wants to get out of this is the scientific and aerospace advancements. they want to see if that suit that felix is going to wear is going to be the next generation spacesuit, to see if people can survive outside a space vehicle inside event of a malfunction. >> what a soir, brian, thank you. >>> you're in "the situation room." happening now, mitt romney says president obama is leading from behind. but he isn't the first to use that description. we have the reporter who heard it first from a member of the obama administration. >>> we also have inside information about vice president joe biden's preparations for his crucial debate with paul ryan. and depending on how old you are, you're going to find out how much money you will need to save right now to have a comfortable retirement. we want to welcome our viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> we begin this hour with mitt romney's declarati
guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ...and we inspected his brakes for free. -free is good. -free is very good. [ male announcer ] now get 50% off brake pads and shoes at meineke. >>> all right. time now for the "ridiculist." tonight, we're adding all the nonbelievers out there. in case you don't know any 12-year-old girls a believer is what the kids called the super fans of pop star justin bieber. you have the non-beliebers on the "ridiculist." even if you're not familiar with his music, you think music should be in quotation marks when it refers to what he does, you got to admit that young man has one heck of a work ethic. so much so, in fact, that even if he barfs onstage in the middle of a concert, he just keeps on going. >> yeah. he just leaned right over and hurled onstage right in the middle of a song but do you think a little bit of vomit can stop the tiny juggernaut that is justin bieber? no. he just kept on going. later that night, he tweeted this. quote, great show, getting
results in just two days. the research was published in the journal, "science translational medicine." the paper reported the tests of just six newborns in neonatal units, but the implications could be widespread. roughly 20% of infant deaths in the u.s. are caused by inherited genetic conditions, according to the study. doctor stephen kingsmore led the research team at children's mercy hospitals in kansas city. he's the director for the center for pediatric genomic medicine there. dr. kingsmore, welcome, and thank you for being with us. first of all,-- >> thank you very much. >> warner: how big a breakthrough is this? >> this is a big breakthrough. we've been working toward this goal for a coup of years now. there has been a big gap between the knowledge that we have of genetic diseases, about 35% of them, and the ability for doctors to identify which of these was a problem in any given child with an illness. >> warner: and up until now, how much have you been able to diagnose the d.n.a. abnormalities? how quickly? i mean, i said it can take weeks and weeks, but what's the process t
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
have the most government-funded research. we push the balance on science and technology, so our best innovators are here. in education, we now, well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to ld the world in college graduates. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers, we are now $2 trillion in deficits in terms of infrastructure. a great education, and get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on each one of these issues that are so vital to our greatest strength. i don't think we can remedy this . and on budget-funded research, it looks wike an e.k.g. heading for a heart attack. in terms of the things that have historically made us great on each one of those indices, i see us not going in the direction we should be going. for me that's the alarm bell and the wake-up call. >> are we as strong as we have ever been or are there ways you see measurable? >> it is on obvious we are not as strong as we have ever been. but also because the world was changed around us. we spent an awful lot of time, eff
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 105 (some duplicates have been removed)